The Tyssaer walls

It is not easy for me to describe the walls. It’s been too long since I went through her the last time. They were not often our playground. There was only one cave on the south side of the Great Walls, which we village boys sometimes visited. Then there was a big, free space in the middle of the Little Walls, where we liked to play and where my football exhaled its “soul”. At the entrance to the walls was a large boulder, which was easy to climb and on which we therefore slide around. As a youth of 15-16 years I climbed with my consumptive guitar and some schoolmates on the “Long Franz”, the highest rock of the small walls (named after the Prince of Thun), and we shocked the villagers with the Gekrächz of student songs. A walk through the walls, who took at least 1-2 hours, only took place when we had visitors. I was not one of the local guides, my dad did not allow that. Rather, these were the poorer school boys who waited barefoot for the church on strangers, especially on Sundays, and offered to guide them through the walls. At the end of the tour, they received a token. A walk through the walls without a guide would really have had only half the charm. The stranger would have admired the bizarre rock forms, but he would certainly have escaped much. Surely he would have walked past the “Echo” and heard nothing of the Tyssa’s wit, nor could he have ever discovered the many hidden rock formations to which the natives’ imagination had given characteristic and apt names. if we had visit. I was not one of the local guides, my dad did not allow that. Rather, these were the poorer school boys who waited barefoot for the church on strangers, especially on Sundays, and offered to guide them through the walls. At the end of the tour, they received a token. A walk through the walls without a guide would really have had only half the charm. The stranger would have admired the bizarre rock forms, but he would certainly have escaped much. Surely he would have walked past the “Echo” and heard nothing of the Tyssa’s wit, nor could he have ever discovered the many hidden rock formations to which the natives’ imagination had given characteristic and apt names. if we had visit. I was not one of the local guides, my dad did not allow that. Rather, these were the poorer school boys who waited barefoot for the church on strangers, especially on Sundays, and offered to guide them through the walls. At the end of the tour, they received a token. A walk through the walls without a guide would really have had only half the charm. The stranger would have admired the bizarre rock forms, but he would certainly have escaped much. Surely he would have walked past the “Echo” and heard nothing of the Tyssa’s wit, nor could he have ever discovered the many hidden rock formations to which the natives’ imagination had given characteristic and apt names. my dad did not allow that. Rather, these were the poorer school boys who waited barefoot for the church on strangers, especially on Sundays, and offered to guide them through the walls. At the end of the tour, they received a gift. A walk through the walls without a guide would really have had only half the charm. The stranger would have admired the bizarre rock forms, but he would certainly have escaped much. Surely he would have walked past the “Echo” and heard nothing of the Tyssa’s wit, nor could he have ever discovered the many hidden rock formations to which the natives’ imagination had given characteristic and apt names. my dad did not allow that. Rather, these were the poorer school boys who waited barefoot for the church on strangers, especially on Sundays, and offered to guide them through the walls. At the end of the tour, they received a gift. A walk through the walls without a guide would really have had only half the charm. The stranger would have admired the bizarre rock forms, but he would certainly have escaped much. Surely he would have walked past the “Echo” and heard nothing of the Tyssa’s wit, nor could he have ever discovered the many hidden rock formations to which the natives’ imagination had given characteristic and apt names. who, especially on Sundays, waited barefoot at the church for strangers and offered to guide them through the walls. At the end of the tour, they received a gift. A walk through the walls without a guide would really have had only half the charm. The stranger would have admired the bizarre rock forms, but he would certainly have escaped much. Surely he would have walked past the “Echo” and heard nothing of the Tyssa’s wit, nor could he have ever discovered the many hidden rock formations to which the natives’ imagination had given characteristic and apt names. who, especially on Sundays, waited barefoot at the church for strangers and offered to guide them through the walls. At the end of the tour, they received a gift. A walk through the walls without a guide would really have had only half the charm. The stranger would have admired the bizarre rock forms, but he would certainly have escaped much. Surely he would have walked past the “Echo” and heard nothing of the Tyssa’s wit, nor could he have ever discovered the many hidden rock formations to which the natives’ imagination had given characteristic and apt names. but certainly much would have escaped him. Surely he would have walked past the “Echo” and heard nothing of the Tyssa’s wit, nor could he have ever discovered the many hidden rock formations to which the natives’ imagination had given characteristic and apt names. but certainly much would have escaped him. Surely he would have walked past the “Echo” and heard nothing of the Tyssa’s wit, nor could he have ever discovered the many hidden rock formations to which the natives’ imagination had given characteristic and apt names. 

Was led only by the big walls. The small walls were somewhat neglected; the rock formations were not that bizarre and besides, they had soon been crossed; also one should have turned back at their visit and had to go in the opposite direction. After all, the “Lange Franz” was also a popular destination. If the stone steps, including those with hooks embedded in the rocks, using the parallel iron handrail to the level of the steps, climbed up the rock, then there was a splendid view of Tyssa, especially the fallow land with the saddle mountain in the background. Birch trees were still growing up there, but it was not without danger to break off from these branches, how easily could one fall into a crevice or fall over the whole height of the rock and break his bones against the boulders stuck in the forest floor? Not infrequently, the bad customer rushed through the village: Once again, someone crashed. Two cases I remember exactly: A young girl crashed fatally from the Long Franz, as it wanted to break birch branches. A young man crashed off the “dance-plate” as he tried to jump from this to another rock, and hit a big hole in the back of his head, causing his death. This young man was then laid out in the morgue, and many looked at the big hole in my head as a terrible warning. This always happened on Sundays when the walls were swarming with strangers.

I must add that the Tyssa, which I remember as a major tourist destination, had this enormous appeal only until the outbreak of World War I (August 1, 1914). The good old days ended with this date, and even if the old Danube monarchy had not yet set, all the gaiety and carelessness was gone with the outbreak of war, not to speak of the disgusting conditions after the end of the war, as our beautiful .. was a robbery of the Czechs. Before 1914 there was no perceptible border, the Saxons came to Bohemia and we went to Saxony without any identification, the German mark was worth as much as the Austrian crown, and both currencies were taken into account in each country for the other , 

If we wanted to get into the walls, we used the narrow path next to the cemetery wall, which I already mentioned in the description of the garden. The tourists, however, made the ascent of the church. From there went quite steep a wide path to the cemetery. And yet the poor horses had to drag the hearse up there. Branching from this path, first to the north, then to the northwest, always rising, you came to the “gap” between the big and the small walls. Left stood a solitary, fist-shaped rock, each with a hole left and right, so that it looked as if the rock had a face to the left and right – the Janus head. On the right, you walked through deep sand between two rocks into the walls and came to a free place: When it was still hot outside, here it was always pleasantly cool. (In some crevices it was often snow until June). First, we turned back to the entrance and found to the left of this between 2 rocks high on a 3rd rock a crown carved. The local guide would now stretch his arm up there and lecture us: here the Prince of Schwarzenberg shot the last golden eagle in the year. Then he would show us on the opposite side the ascent to the “wall”: stone steps leading up in heels between the rocks, where we would again find iron handrails to support our ascent. Once at the top, we could now go uninterruptedly on the rocks to the end of the wall, with the steep depth to the right and bushes to the left. At particularly dangerous places, a railing would save us from falling. But we want to follow our guide on the way through the walls. When we have stepped out of the first group of rocks, we see from afar the “Doctor” and the “Mayor”, the first a slender, the second a round rock, both with a head-shaped attachment. In order to get to this group of rocks we turn now from our previous east path to the north and take then behind the doctor back east course (which we then maintain). We come to a place where there are no large rocks, but from there we have a view of a patchy row of rocks in the north, which is perfectly suited to throw the sound back – we are at the “Echo”. Our leader will now form a megaphone with his hands and shout some classic sentences to the north, eg “What do the students eat?” – “ducks” will be back. When asked, “What does Frau Maier cook?”, It stops “eggs”. Not to forget the question “What is the name of the mayor of Wesel?” From the echo we learn it: He is called “donkey”. Then the walls pick us up again and we often crawl through crevices that are so narrow we have to go through with our shoulders first. Sometimes we go very fast, because between two rocks imprisoned boulders threaten to fall down on us or threaten greyish rock formations like the trapped tailor or the knight or we want to dodge dripping water. Finally we have escaped the oppressive rocks and now climb the rocks on the road to Schneeberg, to which the beautiful rock formation of the “mushroom” is put on, a real fungus with a narrow stem and a broad hat and therefore difficult to climb. Our guide will now show an egg-shaped rock that lies on another rock and with the words: “This is the stone nut and now it’s over” he will say goodbye to us.